where i stand sunday

IMG_8748

These are such a small part of the booth but a necessary component of the orchestra that is making up my first time exhibiting at the International Quilt Market. A low grade mixture of excitement and nervousness is with me throughout each day as the date creeps closer.

 

Where I Stand Sunday is an ongoing photo essay examining the different places I spend my life standing. Too often we take for granted the everyday places we spend our lives walking on. The ground we tread on has its own stories to tell.

 

small-blog-divider-use-this-one-350x45

p a u s e (and why i stopped blogging)

I’m not one of those bloggers that believes in apologizing when I’m away from posting for a while. I mean, life is life, right? Can’t always be available all of the time to get a post written.But I have to admit that I’ve been trying to figure out my lack of posts lately. It’s not that I haven’t wanted to blog, it’s just something has held me back. I finally figured it out yesterday and I’ve made a massive mistake.

At some point along the way I decided that every post needed to be magazine worthy. I felt it needed to be grand and sweeping in order to be worthwhile. For the record? No one told me I had to do this. Something shifted in the way I viewed my blog and it wasn’t good nor fair. To you or to me. So I’ve been avoiding posting because that broken mindset told me that if I didn’t toil in my studio for an entire day writing an extremely detailed how-to post, you wouldn’t like it.

How silly.

My practice at my previous blog was much more lighthearted. Much more…all over the place. Because I’m a firm believer that building a creative life doesn’t happen only within your studio walls. It’s about all the tiny details in life. I know some “experts” will disagree but when I think about the blogs I like best? They talk about everything. And I mean everything – pets, kids, food, what color the sky is. You name it, it goes up. And that’s how I used to be be and I realize I really really really miss it.

So I’m going back to my old ways. I’m leaving behind the self-imposed pressure to perform and just do my thing like I did when first began writing a blog. I suspect some current readers won’t care for it and I’m sorry if you choose to leave but man, this joint has become too quiet for my taste. I’m going to do what feels best in my bones to liven it back up. Starting with this simple silly little post. I’ve seen some versions of it on other blogs and I dig it – I’ve given it my own name and twist and I really thing it brings humanity back to these posts and maybe you’ll find something we have in common.

Thanks for giving me the space to find my blogging mojo again and I hope you like it as well as I do. :)

 

IMG_8737

This pause has me looking at these good things in my life…

What I’m making…lots and lots of plans for the International Quilt Market which is next month. I’m a bit of a spaz at the moment (ignore that twitch beneath my left eye, will ya?)

What I’m readingThe Lace Reader. (It’s my fourth time through it, love it that much.)

What I’m eatingChana Masala. It’s an Indian dish that involves chick peas, rice and too many spices to list and I love it. Awesome vegetarian dish.

What I’m wanting…this sweater that couldn’t say “autumn” more if it was capable of speaking.

What I’m hoping for…a long autumn with lots of color (whoa there winter, you’ll get your turn).

small-blog-divider-use-this-one-350x45

full on ninja planning mode

So if you visit with me on social media you know that I’m exhibiting at the International Quilt Festival in Houston at the end of October to celebrate my new fabric line with Red Rooster Fabrics and my book and all my other items that I geek out about. I haven’t had this many to-do lists since I first started my business. While there have been moments of panic, I’m pretty excited about the whole thing. The biggest item on my list is figuring out my booth design.

I did this the other day:

IMG_8566

 

My garage floor now has a turquoise duct tape faux booth. I needed to see the size in real life because I’ve managed to make a 10′x10′ booth WAY bigger in my head. It’s good to see it and now I can plan accordingly. I’ve got a couple of big pieces, mysteriously shown in this box:

 

IMG_8560

 

I’m so eager to show it all. I really am but I want to save it for the final set up because really, in pieces? Not so impressive. It’s just like printing fabric – the layers need to all come together in order for it to be any kind of interesting.

There has been some of this during the planning as well:

IMG_8563

Atwater Brewrey is one of my favorites and cherry stout? Mercy. In Love. This one is tied with their coffee one. Yes, you read that right – coffee beer. Doesn’t get much better then that.

So the blog is going to be full of Market Market Market (say that part in the Brady Bunch “Marsha Marsha Marsha” whiney voice for full effect) but I’m hoping you don’t mind. Since it’s my primary occupation in the studio right now, it’s either don’t blog at all or take you along for the ride.

Houston Quilt Market or bust!! :)

small-blog-divider-use-this-one-350x45

 

evolution of a coffee cup print

During the blog hop release party for my book Intentional Printing, Virginia Spiegel cooked up a great exchange. The idea was to create 6″ squares of fabric featuring a mutual love amongst all the participants , the coffee cup. Each participant was asked to use three techniques from the book and include the cup as part of the design. The work everyone produced was incredible! :)

Gordana Vukovic was one of the participants and here are the twelve awesome pieces she created:

JavaArtWorks_GordanaSV

artwork by Gordana Vukovic, used with permission

 

(I was lucky to get the middle one in the third row – love it!) She wrote a blog post talking about the process that she worked through to make them and I thought you might like to swing by and visit her to see how she went about it. And while you’re there, be sure to take a stroll through her art portfolio – very lovely work! :)

small-blog-divider-use-this-one-350x45

 

sunday inspiration

A little bit of inspiration to wrap up your week, this one is quite cool. :)

 

 

 

 

small-blog-divider-use-this-one-350x45

time to TAP – Lesley Riley’s new book!! :)

The very fabulous and talented Lesley Riley has released another book and she’s celebrating in style so be sure to read on. :) Her latest masterpiece features all the ways you can use Transfer Artist Paper (TAP). TAP is Lesley’s brain child, it’s a very cool versatile product that let’s you transfer just about anything onto just about anywhere. (Versatility rocks.)

Here’s the book:

IMG_8493

 

You can snag one here.

There are LOADS of projects in this book. I mean it’s bursting at the seams!! I’m very excited to have been one of the contributors and I flexed my TAP muscles by making this pillow:

IMG_8490

I have an addiction to pillows. I have enough to build a house from. (Seriously.)

Here’s a closer look:

IMG_8487

 

The striped circles and Xs are done with TAP. Nifty, right? :) All the details on how to make it are in the book along with other groovy projects.

Lesley is introducing you to all the contributors of the book on her blog starting today. She’ll chat up two of us every day and hold a daily drawing for  rocking good stuff like the new book and TAP. So you’ll want to stop by and visit her everyday through Sunday this week, okay? She’s extremely kind and generous and talented so you want to know her even without the giveaways. :)

Enjoy!!

small-blog-divider-use-this-one-350x45

 

inspiration wednesday

Just a little bit of inspiration to break up the work week. :)

 

 

small-blog-divider-use-this-one-350x45

 

submitting a magazine article – an interview with Vivika Hansen DeNegre

I’m a writing junkie, do it constantly. It’s been a privilege to be able to write for several publications – Fiber Art Now, Sew Somerset, Cloth Paper Scissors and Quilting Arts Magazine. In all, I’ve written about thirty articles since 2011.

I get a lot of emails from artists who would like to submit an article asking for advice, wanting to know what the magic trick is. The magic trick is this – be brave enough to take the plunge. :) Editors at magazines are wonderful people. Incredibly kind and generous and always willing to look at new ideas.

Vivika Hansen DeNegre is the editor of Quilting Arts Magazine. I’m happy to also count her amongst my friends and to have worked with her so much. Here we are all smiles at the 2014 Spring International Quilt Market:

10378276_10203059503622778_8764440015161748263_n

I asked if she would be interested in doing a little interview on the topic of article submissions and she said yes. My questions are specifically about submitting to Quilting Arts Magazine. So here’s what she has to say on the topic.

Lynn: Just how mixed media can a quilt be to be included in Quilting Arts Magazine? Does work with lots of embellishments or made with things other than fabric (such as paper) qualify? How far can one stray from the technical definition of a quilt to still fit in with the magazine?

Vivika: I don’t know about you, but I consider a quilt to be a piece of textile work with three layers, held together with stitching. I know that SAQA and other organizations have a broader definition of the term, and I gladly embrace their ideas. As far as mixed media quilts are concerned, just about anything goes. Paper? You bet. Embillishments? Of course. Every artist should make up his or her own mind about what is a quilt and how their artwork fits in, and create from that point. Don’t let definitions define your work, style, or ambition.

 

Lynn: Do you prefer technique or project focused articles? Or is it determined more by the artwork than either of those categories?

Vivika: For Quilting Arts, we look primarily for technique articles, but since this is a visually driven audience and we rely so heavily on beautiful photography, we also like to show finished pieces of artwork that include the technique. For instance, if you submit an article about embellishing with traditional French embroidery, include an image of a quilt or piece of artwork showcasing the technique. For our Special Issue magazines like Quilting Arts Holiday, Quilt Scene, and Modern Patchwork, we primarily are looking for projects.

 

Lynn: You mention “supporting information” in your submission guidelines. Can you give a couple examples of what that means?

Vivika: That means you have to tell us what you are proposing for an article. A good article proposal includes low resolution images (low resolution is not the same thing as low quality: the images need to be in focus and show the artwork) as well as a short (1-2 paragraph)_description of the technique or content you are proposing. If we need clarification, we’ll get back to you.

 

Lynn: Can you comment on the lead time for an article? In other words, how long should one expect to wait between approval and seeing it in print?

Vivika: Each submission is acknowledged by an immediate email upon receipt. Submissions are then reviewed within 3 months, and we get back to the artists by then. If you don’t hear from us (unfortunately, sometimes this happens!) follow up with another email and we’ll respond promptly. We work 6 months ahead on every issue, so keep that in mind when you submit seasonal projects and ideas. When an article is “booked” to be in an issue, you will be informed of the issue date. Occasionally, articles are bumped to future issues, and the artist is informed.

 

Lynn: Does the photography included with the submission need to be done by a professional?

Vivika: No, it just needs to be clear and good enough for us to really understand what we are looking at. Low resolution images are preferred. If we need to, we ask for further supporting images. We do all of our own photography in house, with the exception of process photos that are sent in by the artists. The exception is Head Shots – every artist should have a professional quality head shot available. (We only use head shots for our gallery/profile type articles.) Make the investment and have this done ahead of time!

 

Lynn: If you could give only one tip to someone submitting an article to help make it successful, what would it be?

Vivika: Just one tip? Look at back issues of the magazines and glean information about what we are looking for and how the articles are written. If you have a great idea, make up a sample and send in a submission. Keep in mind this is a visual audience with high expectations for unique artwork, thorough instructions, and a deep understanding of the art. And don’t overlook the opportunity of having your work published and noticed by our editorial team by joining in on one of our reader challenges. In the last several years, 3 of our cover artists were reader challenge participants.

And have fun! Ok that was more than one suggestion!

 

All magazines have submission guidelines for articles on their websites and/or in the magazine itself. If you’re interested in submitting an article to Quilting Arts Magazine, you can find their submission guidelines here.

If you’ve been thinking about writing an article, I hope this helps clear up some questions – happy writing! :)

 

small-blog-divider-use-this-one-350x45

 

strive

10478238_10204358154423451_115670115610506828_n

 

I’ve been feeling quiet lately. Mostly because there is a lot going on behind the scenes. Planning up to my eyeballs (in a good way) and some new things that make me pause and wonder and realize that it’s time to sort of stretch and do some new things. Not always the easiest thing to embrace is it?

But the one thing I know is that being an artist allows you the permission to experiment when the calling hits. And it’s hit. So I’ll listen and just try to go with the flow as best I can.

small-blog-divider-use-this-one-350x45

 

piecing with hand printed fabrics

10568986_10204379337993027_2030515033455783333_n

 

I’ve flirted with piecing for a long time. I’ve been practicing more with it and using my hand printed fabrics. I have to say that I’m falling in love. I hear all the time that hand printed fabric can’t be used for piecing. Not so.

I made this little fella with samples from my book:

10429466_10204380879511564_2702046216135499164_n

 

It’s sort of scrappy and a little fly-by-the-seat-of-my-pants design but it’s fun. And cute. And I’m getting ready to stitch it until it begs for mercy. (Is there any other way?)

So don’t hide those hand printed fabrics away, use them in your piecing – they play nicely together! :)

small-blog-divider-use-this-one-350x45

 

stencil/book winner & sunday inspiration

Well, I want to  say that I think someone has stolen 2014. I mean, all I do is blink and another chunk of the year is gone. That time warp is the reason for my tardiness for announcing the winner of the stencils and book and fabric. Better late than never, right?

The winner of the stencils, book and fabric is Beth G. – congrats Beth! I’ll email you for your address.

And on this fine Sunday afternoon, here’s a little bit of screen printing geekiness for some inspiration. (I’m a junkie and I’m not sorry.)

 

 

 

“Marked” and book giveaway! :)

Well it’s finally my turn to give a chat about Marked, my new stencils out with Artistcellar. And I’ve got some gabbing to do. But before we get to all that, let me show you what I’m including in my giveaway to celebrate:

IMG_8190

Leave a comment on this post by noon on Saturday July 12 and you’ll be in on the drawing to win the goodies in the photo above, I’ll announce the winner later that afternoon. That’s my book, a set of stencils and a few strips of fabric I printed using Marked. So get commenting! :)

And if you’re interested in visiting the other artists on the hop, swing on by the Pinterest board I set up for Marked to admire their incredible artwork as well as link to their posts to check out their giveaways:

Screen Shot 2014-07-05 at 9.20.34 PM

Marked is all about my obsession with print. I love patterns and I love being able to apply it easily to fabric so really, stencils are a perfect marriage. I grabbed a hunk of my RIT dyed fabric and painted some deColourant (a medium that actually removes color from the fabric, almost like bleach but not as stinky or harsh) through them to get this fabric:

IMG_8124

IMG_8128

IMG_8132

IMG_8135

 (Just a quick note about deColourant – even though it’s one of the lesser smellier discharge mediums out there, you should still use it in a well ventilated area. You just brush it through the stencil with a sponge brush, let it dry completely, and then iron it to make the discharge magic happen.)

On the last piece of fabric there with the commas as the discharged image, I did an overprint of the Xs stencil in blue to jazz it up. The orange and black marks are fabric marker just to add a little definition.

I really loved how the fabric came out so I wanted to make something a little functional with it so I’d see it all the time. I chose the Beanbag Desk Weights from my book, Intentional Printing:

IMG_8192

 

IMG_8198

 

But I didn’t stop there. (Stenciling is really addictive.) I’ve been bitten by the hexie bug:

IMG_8152

 

I grabbed the Xs and Comma stencils and traced them onto some scrap fabric with a fabric marker:

IMG_8179

 

IMG_8182

 

And made these little cuties:

IMG_8185

(I have a pack of 450 templates. I think I’m going to making a lot more.)

What I like most about these stencils? They work with a lot of different styles – as well demonstrated by all the talented ladies on the blog hop. I hope you’ve been having as much fun as I have visiting all them. And don’t forget to leave a comment on my post here to get in on my drawing. Woo! Stencils! :)

 

small-blog-divider-use-this-one-350x45

 

 

“Marked” stencils – let’s have a party! :)

I’m a bit of a design junkie, I’ve got sketchbooks full of illustrations and drawings and doodles and quite honestly, I’m always beyond thrilled when I can find someone who is a pattern lover as much as I am. So to say that I am thrilled about this is an understatement:

Screen Shot 2014-06-29 at 9.32.15 PM

 

I am super happy to say that I am now a member of the Artistcellar family. My stencil collection is called Marked. It’s a set of patterns that can be used to create backgrounds, little focal points in collages or any manner of artwork your brilliant little mind can conjur up.

We’re having a blog hop to celebrate which translates into all kinds of art eye candy and chances to win a set for yourself. I got fiesty with some deColourant. You’ll have to wait for my turn to post to see what I did with them but here’s a peek:

IMG_8140

I’ve also got a couple of extra special suprises in my giveaway – think *cough* book *cough* fabric bits *cough* – but you’ll have to wait until July 6 and come back to visit me. :)

I’m just so thrilled with these, I can’t begin to say. These are so so so easy to use and it’s yet another way for you to put pattern on your artwork – paper and fabric and wood and pretty much anything you can get to stand still long enough. And Artistcellar really puts out a quality product, these will last you a long time no matter what medium you use with them – paint, deColourant, thickened dye, molding paste. What’s not to love about that??

I’ve started a Pinterest board to capture all the stenciling goodness and will continue to add to it over the course of the hop (and of course if are willing to share your creations as well):

Screen Shot 2014-06-29 at 10.18.17 PM

So here’s the list of blog hoppers. Go show them some love, throw your hat in the ring to win a set of stencils and get ready to do some printing! Woo!! :)

June 28th – Lisa Cousineau  (You can enter her giveaway at her blog until July 6)

June 29th – Melanie Testa (You can enter her giveaway at her blog until July 6)

June 30th – Lisa Chin
 
July 1st – Jen Osborn
 
July 2nd – Belinda Spiwak
 
July 3rd – Kristin LaFlamme
 
July 4th – Ingrid Dijkers
 
July 5th – Guadalupe Cabal
 

July 6th – me :)

 

small-blog-divider-use-this-one-350x45

 

time to confront it

IMG_7982

graphic by Lynn Krawczyk

I want to talk about this more. I want to shine some light on it. Because every time I make a statement along the lines of it’s okay to make mistakes, I get push back from some people. And it all revolves around the idea that they are bad. Something horrible. Something to be avoided at all costs.

And while I don’t know anyone in this world that gets up in the morning and says, “I’m going to make lots of mistakes today and it’s going to be fantastic!”, I think it’s been demonized to a point that encourages procrastination and paralysis in us artists. So that’s what I’d like to focus on – why artists are so darn afraid of making mistakes.

I can’t say that I’m immune to it. I find myself holding back sometimes because I’m worried about botching something up. But there is value to a piece of fabric where the printing ran off on a tangent and now I don’t like it. It teaches me things, it helps me grow and it makes me inventive if I’m in one of my stubborn moods and not wanting to “waste” it. Mistakes give me that.

I think if we talk about it more, that maybe it would be easier to deal with them. What do you think? Why are you afraid of making mistakes in your artwork?

small-blog-divider-use-this-one-350x45

 

Heirloom Sewing Techniques blog hop! :)

 

The wonderful Cheryl Sleboda has just released her first DVD workshop with Interweave, Heirloom Sewing Techniques for Today’s Quilters:

14QM15

 

And as we quilters like to do when one of our own creates something full of awesomeness, we’re celebrating with a giant blog hop and geeking out to all the goodness that she’s crammed into her workshop. Before I get to chatting about it, here is the list of other hoppers. They are all awesome artists so you’ll want to visit them anyhow but they are also offering a review of Cheryl’s DVD.

Here are the other players on the hop, be sure to visit them all:

June 9 - Susan Brubaker Knapp

June 10 – Maddie Kertay

June 11 – Faith Jones

June 12 – me :)

June 13 – Julie Creus

June 16 – Catherine Redford

June 17 – Megan Dougherty

June 18 – Pokey Bolton

June 19 – Jamie Fingal

June 20 – Cheryl Sleboda

So let’s get to the good stuff – what’s in this DVD? I will say that I didn’t really know what to expect because while I’ve followed Cheryl for a long time and love her work, my artwork is very much of the flat variety. So I was very curious how she gets dimension. And not only that but how she gets it to do her bidding in her quilts (it does look like it has a mind of it’s own.)

She covers the following types of fabric manipulation: smocking, circles (woo! circles!), fabric flowers, pleats and pintucks. And what I really liked is that some are done by hand and some are done by machine. So regardless of which you favor, you’ll be able to start pumping up your fabric.

Not only does Cheryl cover a topic like smocking, but she shows you several variations. Very clear, very good direction. And since it’s a DVD, you can keep backing her up and making her repeat herself, it’s a great way to learn. In fact, because of my nutty schedule, DVDs are kind of the only way I get to take classes anymore. I’m a fan.

And being the clever chick that she is, Cheryl has invented her very own Heirloom Smocking Template to help simplify the process of marking the fabric. (This is a very good idea, you’ll agree once you watch her DVD and see how you would mark it with just a ruler. She’s got your sanity in mind with this template.)

After I watched her DVD, I was itching to give the circle manipulation technique a go. So I grabbed some of my painted fabric and started a little piece:

scrunched fabric

Mine is a bit of a challenge because the paint makes the fabric stiffer which makes it harder to scrunch. But I’m stubborn and made it through several bunches before I called it a night. I REALLY like this and let me tell you why – it’s a way to add dimension that isn’t over the top. It doesn’t add weight to your quilts, it just takes the things that you would already use and gives them a twist (literally) so that you can create something truly unique.

Cheryl gives you lots of techniques in the DVD and she doesn’t leave you hanging when it comes to how to use them. She’s got several examples on what you can do with your lovely manipulated fabric from quilt blocks to wearables to home dec. I love that she did this, it’s always grand to have ideas on how you can incorporate your stuff.

I really hope you’ll pick up a copy of the DVD, she did a wonderful job. And on a personal note, I spent some time with Cheryl the last time we did tapings for QATV and she is fantastic. (And I’m not just saying that because she brought me coffee.)

She is quirky and kind and full of knowledge and just an all around fun person. You can learn a lot from her while feeling like you’re just hanging out with one of you. To give you a sense for how cool she is, I’ll leave you with this reaction video she shot of herself watching her DVD for the first time. (She was nervous about it but she didn’t need to be. She did great!)

 

 

small-blog-divider-use-this-one-350x45

 

done is better than perfect?

I’m taking an online class in which the teacher made that declaration:

DONE IS BETTER THAN PERFECT.

I tend to agree. If I only made things that were perfect, I’d probably not make anything at all.

What do you think?

small-blog-divider-use-this-one-350x45

sunday inspiration

 The winner of the Pocket Stencil Blog Hop is Arlene Holtz – congrats! Just hop on over to Artistcellar’s website and choose which set of Pocket Stencils you’d like to use and they are your’s! :) You can email me your mailing address at smudged@earthlink.net

 *******

I’ve watched this ten times. I’ll probably just keep hitting “play again” for the rest of the day. LOVE it. A wee bit of inspiration as we prepare for a new week. :)

 

 

small-blog-divider-use-this-one-350x45

 

 

pocket stencil blog hop – cable tamer tutorial & giveaway! :)

The wonderfully creative folks over at Artistcellar have come out with some more stencils that had me flinging paint like a wild woman. (They are making me a complete stencil junkie and really, I have no complaints.) This time they are called Pocket Stencils and their tagline is BIG IDEAS COME IN SMALL PACKAGES. Truer words have never been spoken.  And can I just say that they are super adorable?

1

Before I get rolling with my tutorials (this is a long post, I went wild), I want to mention that there is a blog tour going on for these lovelies and at each stop there is a giveaway for one set of Pocket Stencils of your choosing. So leave a comment on this post by noon EST on Sunday June 8 and I’ll pick a winner. And to increase your chances of snagging a set, swing on by the other artists on the hop to get in on their drawings. Plus they have also done projects for lots of ideas on what you can do with them so you’ll want to see that too, good stuff going on there:

May 31 – Lisa Cousineau

June 1 – Belinda Spiwak

June 2 – Amy O’Toole

June 3 – Lea Cioci

June 4 – me :)

June 5 – Effy Wild

June 6 – Tamara Laporte

 

These little darlings are ATC sized and have holes punched in a  corner so you can put them on a ring to keep them tidy. (They think of everything.) Their small stature really inspired me because I had a project in mind for a while now but just wasn’t sure what I wanted to print on them. Ever heard of Cable Tamers? They help hold your charging cables for your phones, tablets, etc and earbuds in a neat little bundle so you don’t look like a crazy woman trying to untangle it from the depths of your purse.

They are small, simple and while there are plenty out there to buy, I have a studio full of fabric and paint and snaps and I’m not afraid to use them. Enter Artistcellar’s Pocket Stencils and I also had the perfectly sized graphic to print on them. I made these:

6

(My earbuds are little russian nesting dolls. They’re quirky and I think music sounds better through them.)

Let me show you how easy they are to make. You need felt, size 1 snaps, thread to sew on the snaps, Pocket Stencils, a sponge brush and paint:

2

I ended up using the Chakra, Create Words and Virtue words on another project (shown after this one). So many cool choices, I want to stencil everything now.

To make your Cable Tamer, do the following:

(1) Cut a strip of felt 1.5″ wide x 4″ long.

(2) Choose a groovy stencil and using a sponge brush and paint, add your design to the felt:

3

 

4

 

5

I have to admit that I’ve not printed on felt before. I always figured it would act like a sponge and just suck up all the paint. To an extent it kind of did but it wasn’t so horrible that it disappeared like I dreaded. I will mention though that the blue paint on the yellow felt is textile paint and the orange paint on the red felt is just craft acrylic. After they dried, the blue stayed flexible and I found a couple little peeling spots on the orange. So for this particular project, it does matter if you use textile paint or not.

3) Flip the strip over to the unprinted side (after it’s dry, of course) and sew on the snaps. Position them about a quarter of an inch from the edge in the center of the width:

IMG_7875

 

I’m in love with the final result:

IMG_7900

So simple but so useful. Felt is kind of stretchy so I expect over time these may get a little distorted. But I can make replacements very easily so I’m not worried about it.

Now I didn’t stop there, and decided I wanted a slow stitching project that is the complete opposite of the Cable Tamers. I made some Meditation Cloth with the Chakra, Create Words and Virtue Words sets:

11

What in the world is Meditation Cloth? It’s one of the projects in my book, Intentional Printing. I refer to it as my free therapy. Because these are created for no other purpose then because you want to make them and they take a long time to complete. Perfect for all those spare moments while waiting for appointments or after a long day and you’re wound so tight you can’t see straight. (It’s calorie free too in case you enjoy the occasional wine or chocolate as stress relievers.)

I had some fabric left from a book sample that had large sweeping arcs of chartreuse paint on it. I took each one of the Chakra stencils and printed them in different colors on the fabric:

8

Aren’t they intoxicating? Pattern and rhythm and lots of good vibes going on there.

After they dried, I took white paint and printed the words over top of everything:

9

I LOVE the words. They speak to a very peaceful frame of mind and since Meditation Cloth is meant to take a long time to finish, I love that I will get to look at them and really think about what they mean to me.

I started the stitching for this piece before printing the words by running it quickly through the sewing machine. I like to do a combination of machine and hand stitching on these, lends some great texture.

I grabbed a variegated Aurifil thread and began hand stitching on small section:

10

Slow. Steady. Meditation through thread and fabric. Bliss. :)

How can you not be inspired with tools like this to work with? They’re incredibly versatile, I have every confidence that you’ll love them as much as I do. Got any ideas, yet? :)

small-blog-divider-use-this-one-350x45

 

the printed fabric bee – typography giveaway

The members of The Printed Fabric Bee had a great time with Lisa Chin’s theme of Typography. Before I show the fabric I made for her, let’s get to the giveaway part. :)

As usual, we have put together a collection of 6″ squares, here is the Typography collection:

lisa+chin+collage

 

The giveaway is open until Friday June 13. Leave a comment on Lisa’s blog post here or on The Printed Fabric Bee’s blog post here to get in on the drawing. Lisa will announce the winner on her blog when she does the drawing.

I got giddy excited about this theme and went super graphic, here’s what I made for Lisa:

Lynn K typography

 

The blue bullseye, grey typewriters and black text are all thermofax screen printing. The yellow? Those were old typeset letters that I don’t use very often because they are kind of hard to print with. They are wood and the slick surface makes them difficult. But as a layer I think they worked well. I realized after I was done that I didn’t take process shots – oops! Got carried away with the paint flinging, I’ll do better next month.

So make sure you follow the links above to leave a comment for the giveaway. Don’t leave a comment on my blog here for that, I’m not the one doing the drawing. ;-)

small-blog-divider-use-this-one-350x45

 

let’s print together – a great starter kit! :)

I’m asked pretty often about starter kits for getting rolling with printing. Well, Interweave has taken care of it for us, check this out:

Screen Shot 2014-06-01 at 6.48.01 PM

Gelli Arts Print Along kit

 

This little bundle really is a wonderful way to get started, you can do a lot with it. And that paint? Look at all that paint. Mmmmmm.. :)

I knew the kit was coming and I thought “Oh I’ll do a quick print on some fabric with the round Gelli plate to show cool it is and put a photo up on the blog.” Really. Who did I think I was kidding? Once I had fabric on my print table and paint in my hands (and in my hair), I just kept going adding layers and ended up with this:

 IMG_7913

A couple of weeks ago I did a radio interview on Mark Lipinski’s Creative Mojo show and he asked me at the very end of it what the one thing is that I want people to take away from my book. That was easy: confidence. More than anything else, I want you to feel confident that you can create printed fabric in your own personal vision and as I made the fabric up above, this is what I wrote in white paint across it:

create with abandon hope love grace kindness and with all the passion your soul can muster. look deep inside your artist heart and trust that your work will sing with the beauty that only your hand can bring.

It really is my deepest, most honest hope for anyone who picks up Intentional Printing. If I’m being very truthful, that’s my hope for every tutorial and article I write. I just want you to be inspired to pick up some paint and just start flinging and feel the absolute joy that I do when I’m working.

Here’s a quick breakdown of how I made that piece up above.

Part of the reason I really love the Gelli Arts round plate is because I’m a circle junkie. So I started the fabric by brushing paint around the edge of the plate and then flipping it upside down to print a ring (I essentially used it kind of like a giant stamp):

IMG_7896

 

Then I did some Drop Cloth Printing (one of the techniques in Intentional Printing that uses a Gelli Arts plate). Because I had the rings printed, I used them as a guide to print in the center of each one. Nifty, eh? (Circles are awesome.)

IMG_7899

 

I knew I wanted to do some paint writing so I needed to add a more solid area for the writing to show up. I did some Fluid Painting (technique in the book) in red paint across the center, waited for it to dry, and then did Paint Writing in white across it. I love the contrast, it just pops out at you.

IMG_7909

The final result again with some Paint Drawing in red circles at the bottom for extra detail.

IMG_7913

 

I plan to make a small art quilt with this as the center “panel” of it. I’ll make some border pieces so it can be larger as this is around fat quarter size. It’s begging for stitching to fill out the design but leaving room for that is part of the process. It was intentional. :)

I really hope that if you’ve been considering surface design, that you’ll give the kit a shot. It’s a great way to fill out your toolbox or start building it. And I’ll be with you every step of the way between the book and the DVD. We can print fabric together. :)

 small-blog-divider-use-this-one-350x45

 

sunday inspiration

I am endlessly fascinated by the art of marbling. It’s not something I’ve tried (yet) and honestly? I love watching other artists do it. Thought you might like this video too, just a little boost of inspiration. :)

 

small-blog-divider-use-this-one-350x45

a shared addiction

Earlier this month, during the book tour for Intentional Printing, there were twenty-one artists (myself included) busily working away on a shared addiction – coffee.

Virginia Spiegel was on the blog hop and she contacted me about doing an exchange using the coffee cup image from the book. To say I was excited was an understatement. It’s no secret that I am a coffee worshiper so the thought of having little artworks from other people bearing one of my favorite images was thrilling. The swap did not disappoint.

I made nine pieces to trade, they all pretty much looked the same (I sometimes have fits of making duplicates, can’t be explained). Here are mine:

Lynn400

Intentional Printing Java Exchange pieces by me

 

And these are the nine pieces I received back from the other artists in the trade:

java exchange pieces

Top row (left to right): Rhonda B., Janice N., Sylvia W.

Middle row (left to right): Michael C., Virginia S., Jay D.

Bottom row: Gordona V., Margaret M., Marissa V.

 

I LOVE EVERY SINGLE ONE OF THEM. I’ve not yet figured out how to display them but it’s high on my list of projects, aren’t they wonderful?? (You can see more work from other artists on Virginia’s site here.)

I am so happy that everyone took their own spin on it, just a bunch of addicts sharing what they love – paint flinging and coffee! :)

small-blog-divider-use-this-one-350x45

 

what I loved most about Quilt Market

Quilt Market was about a week ago. I’ve thought about writing this post several times since then but I’ve been feeling very quiet. I sort of wanted to hoard the experience, even though I posted a lot about it on facebook and instagram. I wanted to hold it in my head and really think about what those three days meant.

Without a doubt, the thing I loved most was meeting the people I have connected with through email and social media. I’ve come to know so many people and feel as though we are friends and when I finally got to meet them face to face? I felt like I was home. That experience alone was worth going. Here’s a few of the faces I snagged some selfies with:

10296556_10152086025315811_5050101580058670086_n

The fabulous Mark Lipinski

 

 

10306267_10203907270831643_5584084734315543055_n

Catherine Redford – I could have talked with her for hours, she’s very cool

 

10325202_10203913156658785_7428781833458286984_n

Morna McEver – full of inspiration and energy, love her!

 

10380961_10203906110682640_3310566352503873651_n

Lynn Harris! She’s a fellow Michigander and she’s got a pretty nifty name too. ;-)

 

10341531_10202759413365367_3570541499711373284_n

Susan Brubaker Knapp – see all the color on her jacket? Hand stitched. Each mark. I swooned, she’s fabulous!

 

image-1

Donna Morales-Oeming – a Facebook friend that is now a real life friend! :) (And she brought me Aurifil threads, I nearly drooled on her.)

 

10378276_10203059503622778_8764440015161748263_n

Vivika DeNegre!! We’d talked on the phone and in email and this was the first time we met in person – adore her, she’s wonderful and a kindred spirit.

 

I visited Melanie Testa at her booth in the Windham Fabrics area, she was showing off her new fabric collection – Meadowlark:

10325338_10203898892942201_5061978424908828294_n

 

I signed some copies of Intentional Printing:

1613867_10203900099892374_1188272945361941030_n

 

I spent the whole time talking and visiting booths and the photos don’t nearly cover all that was there. There was so much to see and I feel as if I missed a ton. I admit that this being my first time there, it was a lot to take in. I have big news to share, will be able to spill the beans shortly. It was fantastic, I truly enjoyed being amongst my tribe and I remembered why I love doing what I do so much.

I did escape one day to go look around Pittsburgh a little bit, it was my first time to the city. (And yes, I ditched out of Quilt Market to go to Loom so I could buy zombie fabric. Kate had bought some the day before and I became obsessed with getting some. I’m a junkie and I’m not sorry.) Here’s a few shots:

10254994_10203907726443033_8543947872965493140_n

10268632_10203901715052752_4535164370777928123_n

10300213_10203908970034122_5917811909494025450_n

10302646_10203909297082298_865321412597529609_n

 

Now that I’ve had some time to think about everything, I’ve got some pretty big huge ambitious goals of what I want to do in the future. Some so grand that I’ve delegated them as 2016 goals. Go big or go home, right?

It’s good to be back with Carter and my studio (even though it seems like it would be easier to just move then to clean it up) and I’m excited for all that there is yet to come. Time to fling paint and make quilts and stitch and just be a textile junkie! Woo! :)

small-blog-divider-use-this-one-350x45

dance

IMG_2172

 

Don’t wish for the rain to go away.
 
Dance in it.
 
 
small blog divider use this one
 
 
 
 

come visit me at Spring Market! :)

book signing promo image

 

I have approximately ninety three post-it-notes stuck to my laptop in an effort to make sure I remember everything I need to for Spring Market.  (I’m still sure I’m going to forget something. I also have post-it-notes stuck to the bathroom mirror. A valiant effort is being made.)

The car is prepped, Carter has enough dog food in the house and I have consolidated my items down to four bags. I just wanted to remind anyone who will be there that I can be found at the F&W booth on Saturday May 17th at 11:45am doing a book signing.

Beyond that, I will be roaming the floor free range. I am SO looking forward to meeting people that I’ve only known online in person and since this is my first time to Market, I sort of expect it to run me over like a pack of wild puppies who are attempting to reach treats. So if you see me and I look dazed, put yourself in my way and say hello so I don’t miss you!

Okay, back to packing – more soon! :)

 

randomly on a sunday

1. I have become mildly obsessed with taking photos of branches against the sky. I’m slowly loosing my view as the leaves are finally finding their way out but in the meantime, I’m in love with the random patterns and moody colors. This one was at night. It glows. I swoon. It’s all good.

IMG_7640

 

2. While at the bookstore this past weekend I spotted Intentional Printing for the first time in the wild. It was a little bizarre and I got kind of giddy and the woman standing next to me looking at the book about knitting socks might have thought I was a little strange when I had to stand on my tip toes to get this picture (I am vertically challenged) but I didn’t care. Made me happy to see it out in the world. :)

IMG_7653

 

3. Carter is…well, he’s Carter. All snuggly and sweet and king of the castle. Observe his well perfected “This is my human, there are many like her but this one is mine” pose.

IMG_7609

 

4. I keep goofing around with this little pieced number. It’s not done. I want to keep adding to it. I like that it’s all kind of oddly crooked and bursting with prints.

IMG_7650

 

5. I bought the strangest little book. It’s a mixture of painterly illustrations of birds and odd words. For example: OLDLINERS: Those who stubbornly cling to old-fashioned landline phones. I sort of shake my head through the whole thing. Love it.

IMG_7657

 

I’m heading to the Spring International Quilt Market in a few days. It’ll be my first time attending. I’m excited and thrilled and nervous and now have a twitch beneath my left eye all at the same time. I figure if I just drink enough coffee, I’ll be a-ok. I’m doing a book signing at the F&W booth on Saturday May 16 at 11:45am. If you’re going to Market, I’d love it if you’d stop by and give a howdy-do.

 

small-blog-divider-use-this-one-350x45

 

five reasons i paid for a website

I know a lot of people don’t think art and business go together but I’m (obviously) not one of them. I take my art career pretty seriously and am continually working to grow and expand what I do. And I think being a successful business person is an art in and of itself.

I posted to my Facebook page that if I had to offer an opinion on the one thing I’m happy I spent money on in my art business, it’s this website. I thought I’d expand on that a little bit as to why this is one topic I feel really strongly about.

Let me preface this by saying that I know not everyone can afford to hire someone to build a site for them. I get that. I was there for a long time myself. If you’re in that position and need to do it yourself, there might still be some ideas in there to help you style your own.

So here’s my two cents for what it’s worth. :)

1. Tidy. My old site (which I did myself) was ok. Just ok. Got the job done but well, never thrilled me. Plus I had my blog on a different site so I was scattered. Always felt like how I do when my studio is a mess, everything is there but it’s not easy to get around. I wanted to consolidate and get that nice warm fuzzy feeling when that matches the thrill I get when I can finally see the floor that used to be covered in a heap of fabric.

2. I know what I don’t know. There are a lot of good template sites out there for basic sites. When I decided to hire Holly Knott (the web guru who built this site for me), I was working on my book. The list of things I wished my website could do for me grew ridiculously long and there was one thing I was certain of: I had no idea how to code a site for all that. And what’s more, I didn’t have the time. I needed help and that’s not an easy thing to hand over control for something that big. But I did. And I’m happy for it.

3. Only one chance for a first impression. Since I want to continue to build my business, I knew I needed a professional looking site. I wanted it to be clean and cool but not cold. Not an easy balance to achieve. The truth is, your website is your virtual handshake to people who are finding you for the first time. I wanted to offer a strong howdy-do.

4. More visitors. Do I get more traffic to my new site? Yes. And the reason is a little harsh but here it is: I like it better so I am happy to send people here. My old site always kind of came with an apology – “Here’s my website but it needs work.” The words always popped out before I could stop them. See? Bad impression. No one is jumping up and down to visit a site that even the owner doesn’t like. Now I wave my cards around like a kid hopped up on sugar. So I get more visitors.

5. Easy to update. Holly took all the work out of figuring out the hard stuff. I got a site that allows me to update it myself and I made the conscious effort to not add so much to the site that it would become a beast to keep up with. Which means it’s still dependent on me parking my behind in front of the laptop to do it but it’s so much simpler now. I’ve got Holly if I get stuck, no worries about having to figure every single thing out for myself. Less stress equals more creativity which equals a much happier artist.

None of this is meant to make you feel inadequate if you’re in the position of not being able to hire someone to do your site. Far from it. It’s just some stuff to keep in your back pocket if you’re moving forward with your art career and this has been on your mind.

How do you choose a designer? That was the hard part. I did a lot of research and narrowed it down to three people. In the end I chose Holly because she had everything that I wanted. And I loved her portfolio, she has a consistent style but everyone’s was unique which means she listens to what you want. (She did, it was awesome to work with her.) Make sure the designer has a portfolio so you can see his/her work and ask for references from people that have worked with him/her.

And for the record? Hiring a web designer does not mean you get to just hand over some cash and she does all the work. It’s a collaboration. You have to participate in the whole process so that you get what you want. Makes it easier on both sides if you go into it with that understanding.

That’s what I know! Hopefully it gives you some food for thought and if you ever have questions, I’m always happy to help where I can. :)

small-blog-divider-use-this-one-350x45

 

fabric wrapped bangle bracelets :)

 

I’ve got tons of projects going on the studio. (I have the mess to prove it.) But every once in a while I need a just-for-fun -super-easy-instant-done project. You know the kind – the kind of project you do for no other reason than because you want to.

Just when I was feeling the itch for one of these little projects, Mark Montano posted this video on his YouTube channel. And all the scraps I’ve been shoving around the studio suddenly seemed to have purpose. Picked up some bangles at a craft store to use as a base and last night before heading off to bed, I made these:

IMG_7534

 

So fun! :) I don’t know how durable these will be (maybe if I sealed them in some matte medium) but I kind of like that they will continue to fray and show their wear. I’m all for letting fabric be fabric and do it’s thing.

Kind of addicted. Kind of want to make a hundred more….

IMG_7542

 

You know what this means right? Every. Single. Scrap. Will be saved from here on out. (I think I need a twelve step program…)

small-blog-divider-use-this-one-350x45

 

winner of the Quasicrystal stencil pack! :)

I’m a day late and a dollar short in terms of when I said I would post this but better late than never! (Especially when there are art supplies involved!)

And as there was a bit of a crossover in the comments since I was doing two giveaways at one time, I did this drawing the same as the other – printed them out and randomly drew from a hat.

The winner of the new Quasicrystal stencil pack from Artistcellar is….

stencil winner

 

Congrats Jo! And thanks to everyone who commented – hope you’ll snag a set of these cool stencils. They can definitely be used over and over in your artwork, love ‘em! :)

small-blog-divider-use-this-one-350x45

 

guest posting on Sew Mama Sew

sms_contrib_aqua_300

 

It’s my extreme pleasure to be guest posting over at Sew Mama Sew today. We’re having a little chat about paint writing on fabric. They are also hosting a giveaway of Intentional Printing so be sure to swing by and get in on the chance to win a copy of the book! :)

small-blog-divider-use-this-one-350x45